Miele del Trentino - Honey

Prodotti del Trentino

Miele del Trentino - Honey

Piccoli Frutti del Cevedale

Miele del Trentino - Honey

E-Shop del Miele Trentino

Benvenuti in Trentino! Welcome to Trentino!

Benvenuti in Trentino! Welcome to Trentino! - Miele del Trentino - Honey

Il miele Trentino è uno degli alimenti più naturali che potete trovare.

Proviene da una combinazione di nettari di fiori di montagna che danno al miele un delizioso e distinto sapore.

Il miele può essere usato durante il giorno come una salutare alternativa allo zucchero, oppure per essere spalmato su una fetta di pane biscottato per la colazione o la merenda!

 

Our Trentino Honey is one of the most natural foods available. It is the combination of nectar from the wild mountain flowers that gives our honey its delicious and distinct flavour. Honey can be used throughout the day as a healthy alternative to sugar, or try it in tea for a delicious tasting cuppa! It's also lovely spread on a thick slice of whole grain bread.  

Il Miele Trentino - Trentino Honey

Il Miele Trentino - Trentino Honey - Miele del Trentino - Honey

Il nostro miele viene prodotto nei prati e boschi del Trentino, in aree scarsamente popolate ai piedi delle vette delle Dolomiti e delle Alpi Retiche.

Il miele trentino è conosciuto in tutto il mondo per la sua qualità e purezza.

 

Our honey comes from the clean, sparsely populated wilderness areas at the foot hills of Trentino Dolomites and Alps. Trentino honey is known around the world as a high value, pure and natural product.

Miele del trentino

Dove trovarci - dove comprare - Where to find us

Dove trovarci - dove comprare - Where to find us - Miele del Trentino - Honey

Siamo una piccola azienda in Val di Pejo, produciamo piccoli frutti e miele.

Potete venire a trovarci a Cogolo , località Pegaja, oppure acquistare ONLINE

 

We are a small family cultivating berries and beekeeping,  producing organic honey in Val di Pejo - Trentino

You can visit us in our coltivation or in our E-SHOP

 

Email: trentinomiele@gmail.com

General Bee Information

General Bee Information - Miele del Trentino - Honey

 

Secondo le stime della
FAO le api si occupano
dell’impollinazione di 71 delle
circa 100 colture che forniscono
il 90 per cento dei prodotti
alimentari a livello mondiale.
Solo in Europa l’84 per cento
delle 264 specie coltivate
dipende dall’impollinazione degli
insetti, mentre 4.000 varietà
di vegetali esistono grazie
all’impollinazione delle api.
 
 

There are four major species of honey bees in the world.
- Age of this species is 19 million years.
- An average beehive, at the height of the season, can hold between 50-100,000 bees.
- The average temperature of a hive is (93 -95 F)
- On average, a honey bee weighs 1/10 gram.
- Honey bee eggs are 1.6mm.
- A worker bee averages between 12-16 millimetres long. Queens and drones are slightly longer.
- Honey bees have 5 eyes, 2 sets of wings and 6 legs.
- Bees communicate by vibrations and chemical cues. They are deaf to most sounds and are mute.
- A worker bee visits between 1,000 flowers each collection trip.
- In one day, a worker bee might visit as many as 10,000 flowers.
- The average worker bee makes 1/12 teaspoon of honey in her lifetime.
- A hive of honey bees must visit over one million flowers to make one kilo of honey.
- Bees can forage for nectar and pollen over a radius of up to 3 kilometres.
- The flight time required to produce 1 kilo of honey is equivalent to one bee travelling 4 times around the world.
- It would take about one ounce of honey to fuel a bee’s flight around the world.
- A hive of bees would have to fly over 30,000 miles to bring you one kilo of honey.
- Flight speed is about 25 kilometres per hour (12 mph).
- Normal wing beats are around 250 cycles/second, whereas buzzing wing beats are 400-500 cycles/second.
- A single hive can produce 15-30 kilos per fortnight on a strong nectar flow.
- Honey bees are the only insects to produce food for humans.
- Bees never sleep, but they do rest inside the hive.
- When a bee stings, it looses it’s stinger and dies.
- Pollinated fruit and vegetables seeds are up to 30% larger and have better germination rates than non-pollinated ones.
- Approximately one half of the human diet is derived directly or indirectly from crops pollinated by bees.
- Honeycombs have six-sided cells.
- When bees take nectar back to the hive, they fan their wings to get the moisture out of it. Then they seal the honey in the combs with wax which they make from special glands.
- Bees maintain a fairly constant temperature in the hive of about 22 degrees Celsius, by fanning their wings. Oh hot summer days, you will see them hanging in bunches out of the hives, trying to get cool.
- Bees carry pollen on their hind legs in a pollen basket, or corbicula.
- They can carry nearly their own weight in nectar and pollen.
- Bees natural enemies include mice, wasps, birds and small mammals.
- Bees attempting to enter a different hive will be killed as intruders, although bees returning with nectar may be admitted.



L'importanza delle api

History of the HoneyBee

History of the HoneyBee - Miele del Trentino - Honey

 

-The latest bee find, one preserved in amber found in Myanmar (Burma), now dates bees to an estimated 100 million years ago, during the Cretaceous. This is the time of dinosaurs, and makes bees even older than Australia. (These were solitary, non-social bees.)
-Honey-storing social bees developed during the Miocene, between 20-10 million years ago. These bees made their nests in hollow trees, caves, crevices, rocks and holes in the ground.
-Hives have been in existence since Palaeolithic times, about 10,000 years (as depicted in early rock paintings in a Spanish cave in Valencia, in which a ladder was used to reach the nest and a container was used to hold the honey combs).
-Ancient Egyptians used honey in religious rites, for feeding the sacred animals, in many ceremonials, and even for preserving corpses.
-Honey as been found in Egyptian tombs, dating back 5,000 years. It was edible, although the colour had changed significantly.
-In 3000 B.C., Egyptians kept written records of beekeeping activities.
-Egyptian hives were transported down the Nile on barges to access floral sources.
-The Rig-Veda, India’s oldest sacred book (between 3,000-2,000 B.C.), contains many references to both honey and bees. Here, honey was also used in many rituals and ceremonies, and in pharmacy.
-In Greece, during the “golden age” (600-140 B.C.), bees were studied for their own interest rather than their exploitation. Aristotle’s Natural History (344-342 B.C.) contains a variety of direct observations on honey and bees. The Iliad and the Odyssey make many references to honey.
-Ancient Romans wrote much about beekeeping and honey production during the Roman expansion (400 B.C. – A.D. 200).
-Roman law declared that bees were the property of the man who placed them in hives, not the person who owned the land.
-In the first Century A.D., honey was listed among the main imports into China from the West, and was highly prized, and used as a medicine.
-In the Middle East, the Arabs, with their Muslim religion (founded by Muhammad the Prophet, A.D. 571-632), built a vast empire which included Northern Africa, Spain and eastwards beyond what is now Iran. An Arab writer (Ibn Magih) quotes Muhammad as saying, “Honey is a remedy for every illness, and the Koran is a remedy for all illnesses of the mind, therefore I recommend to you both remedies, the Koran and honey.”
-Honeybees are not indigenous to the New World, but were introduced by European settlers, although in the sub-tropics and tropics, there did exist another social stingless bee. The Mayas were the greatest honey producers of this area, where hieroglyphs show bees, honeycomb, honey jars and vigorously fermenting mead. Native Americans in the U.S. called honeybees the “white man’s flies”, and they were dreaded as they heralded the arrival of the pale-faced intruders.
-Early European manuscripts (the earliest dating around A.D. 400) describe honey as used for food, drink, medicinal, various preservative purposes, and in magico-religious rites.
-Among many people throughout history, honey has been highly valued and regarded as a magico-religious substance.

 

-Among ancient civilizations, honey was regarded more as a medicine rather than a food.
-Many cultures did not eat honey, but instead used it to make an alcoholic drink, using the fermentation of honey sugars.
-Until about the 1500, bees were killed in the process of gathering honey from various locations where they lived and made honey. After that time, Europeans made many developments in beekeeping techniques.
-By !850, honey was being produced by bees and harvested by man, over almost the whole world. At this time, the modern movable-frame hive was invented, and its use became widely spread.
-Honey bees were introduced to Australia in 1822.
-European bees were successfully introduced to Tasmania in the 1831.

 



 

Honey as been found in Egyptian tombs, dating back 5,000 years. It was edible, although the colour had changed significantly.
-In 3000 B.C., Egyptians kept written records of beekeeping activities. - See more at: file:///K:/Web-api/History%20of%20the%20Honeybee%20_%20Honey%20Tasmania.htm#sthash.NhFxGL0l.dpuf
-The latest bee find, one preserved in amber found in Myanmar (Burma), now dates bees to an estimated 100 million years ago, during the Cretaceous. This is the time of dinosaurs, and makes bees even older than Australia. (These were solitary, non-social bees.)
-Honey-storing social bees developed during the Miocene, between 20-10 million years ago. These bees made their nests in hollow trees, caves, crevices, rocks and holes in the ground.
-Hives have been in existence since Palaeolithic times, about 10,000 years (as depicted in early rock paintings in a Spanish cave in Valencia, in which a ladder was used to reach the nest and a container was used to hold the honey combs).
-Ancient Egyptians used honey in religious rites, for feeding the sacred animals, in many ceremonials, and even for preserving corpses.
-Honey as been found in Egyptian tombs, dating back 5,000 years. It was edible, although the colour had changed significantly.
-In 3000 B.C., Egyptians kept written records of beekeeping activities.
-Egyptian hives were transported down the Nile on barges to access floral sources.
-The Rig-Veda, India’s oldest sacred book (between 3,000-2,000 B.C.), contains many references to both honey and bees. Here, honey was also used in many rituals and ceremonies, and in pharmacy.
-In Greece, during the “golden age” (600-140 B.C.), bees were studied for their own interest rather than their exploitation. Aristotle’s Natural History (344-342 B.C.) contains a variety of direct observations on honey and bees. The Iliad and the Odyssey make many references to honey.
-Ancient Romans wrote much about beekeeping and honey production during the Roman expansion (400 B.C. – A.D. 200).
-Roman law declared that bees were the property of the man who placed them in hives, not the person who owned the land.
-In the first Century A.D., honey was listed among the main imports into China from the West, and was highly prized, and used as a - See more at: file:///K:/Web-api/History%20of%20the%20Honeybee%20_%20Honey%20Tasmania.htm#sthash.NhFxGL0l.dpuf

History of the Honeybee

amberbee

-The latest bee find, one preserved in amber found in Myanmar (Burma), now dates bees to an estimated 100 million years ago, during the Cretaceous. This is the time of dinosaurs, and makes bees even older than Australia. (These were solitary, non-social bees.)
-Honey-storing social bees developed during the Miocene, between 20-10 million years ago. These bees made their nests in hollow trees, caves, crevices, rocks and holes in the ground.
-Hives have been in existence since Palaeolithic times, about 10,000 years (as depicted in early rock paintings in a Spanish cave in Valencia, in which a ladder was used to reach the nest and a container was used to hold the honey combs).
-Ancient Egyptians used honey in religious rites, for feeding the sacred animals, in many ceremonials, and even for preserving corpses.
-Honey as been found in Egyptian tombs, dating back 5,000 years. It was edible, although the colour had changed significantly.
-In 3000 B.C., Egyptians kept written records of beekeeping activities.
-Egyptian hives were transported down the Nile on barges to access floral sources.
-The Rig-Veda, India’s oldest sacred book (between 3,000-2,000 B.C.), contains many references to both honey and bees. Here, honey was also used in many rituals and ceremonies, and in pharmacy.
-In Greece, during the “golden age” (600-140 B.C.), bees were studied for their own interest rather than their exploitation. Aristotle’s Natural History (344-342 B.C.) contains a variety of direct observations on honey and bees. The Iliad and the Odyssey make many references to honey.
-Ancient Romans wrote much about beekeeping and honey production during the Roman expansion (400 B.C. – A.D. 200).
-Roman law declared that bees were the property of the man who placed them in hives, not the person who owned the land.
-In the first Century A.D., honey was listed among the main imports into China from the West, and was highly prized, and used as a

honeyhunters

medicine.
-In the Middle East, the Arabs, with their Muslim religion (founded by Muhammad the Prophet, A.D. 571-632), built a vast empire which included Northern Africa, Spain and eastwards beyond what is now Iran. An Arab writer (Ibn Magih) quotes Muhammad as saying, “Honey is a remedy for every illness, and the Koran is a remedy for all illnesses of the mind, therefore I recommend to you both remedies, the Koran and honey.”
-Honeybees are not indigenous to the New World, but were introduced by European settlers, although in the sub-tropics and tropics, there did exist another social stingless bee. The Mayas were the greatest honey producers of this area, where hieroglyphs show bees, honeycomb, honey jars and vigorously fermenting mead. Native Americans in the U.S. called honeybees the “white man’s flies”, and they were dreaded as they heralded the arrival of the pale-faced intruders.
-Early European manuscripts (the earliest dating around A.D. 400) describe honey as used for food, drink, medicinal, various preservative purposes, and in magico-religious rites.
-Among many people throughout history, honey has been highly valued and regarded as a magico-religious substance.

-Among ancient civilizations, honey was regarded more as a medicine rather than a food.
-Many cultures did not eat honey, but instead used it to make an alcoholic drink, using the fermentation of honey sugars.
-Until about the 1500, bees were killed in the process of gathering honey from various locations where they lived and made honey. After that time, Europeans made many developments in beekeeping techniques.
-By !850, honey was being produced by bees and harvested by man, over almost the whole world. At this time, the modern movable-frame hive was invented, and its use became widely spread.
-Honey bees were introduced to Australia in 1822.
-European bees were successfully introduced to Tasmania in the 1831.

egyptian-beekeepers

Recommended Reading:

- See more at: http://honeytasmania.com/honeybees/history-of-the-honeybee/#sthash.RiBsNIR6.dpuf
  • 21/10/2014
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